Self Drive Namibia Safaris: Who Needs a Guide When It’s So Darn Easy?

Who needs a guide when self-drive Namibia safaris are just so darn easy? If you wish to maximize your freedom and leisure, desire a more economical approach to fulfilling your African safari dream, yet never be coerced into sacrificing the experience, then a self-drive is just for you.

Namibia is a brilliant country for families who desire to go on safari. Smashed between two of the world’s oldest deserts, the climate is especially pleasant. Comfortable conditions are the norm throughout much of the year.

Lodges and camping facilities are lovely and family friendly with first class facilities. The campsites in Etosha are fenced (perfect for self-drive Namibia safaris!) adding an additional layer of security between your children and the wild.

Self-drive safaris are one of the most cost-effective ways to safari Namibia. Travel at your own pace with considerable, customized, flexibility. Choose the perfect vehicle that is tailored to your needs. Create an itinerary that fulfills your interests and places of accommodation that suite your budget. Whether your safari is geared towards wildlife, nature, culture, history, sightseeing, health, adventure, or a slice of everything, self-drive Namibia safaris can be tailored for all.

Really…why is it so darn easy?

Road maps are provided by self-drive Namibia safaris vehicle hire companies that highlight your chosen itinerary. Well maintained roads are complimented by well marked and highly visible road signs keeping you on track, and in addition to Namibia’s small population you won’t be fighting traffic. Camps and lodges are easy to find and vehicles are designed for long distance travel -multiple spare tires, larger/extra fuel tanks, and all the necessary tools -fuel stations are easily obtainable and well marked.

Answer your questions and concerns about your African safari and get started planning your safari today! http://wildsafariafrica.com/about/your-specialist-in-african-safari-planning/

Namibia: A New Tourist Destination

Namibia has been described as the last frontier, a wild and rough country, exposed to the elements like no other southern African nation. Sandwiched between two of the world’s oldest deserts, the Namib and Kalahari, the landscapes are weathered, desolate, and exposed to some of the harshest conditions on the face of our planet. From the rolling hills of Kaokoland, to the Skeleton Coast and the misty cold blanket of the South Atlantic, to the diamond rich area of Sperrgebeit, Namibia is a diverse and contrasting place to experience, luring in the mysterious frontier for explorers to make a hot new tourist destination.

So with all this excitement why has it now only become a new tourist destination?

As a journalist in 1980 noted…

“South Africa has mobilized thousands of military reservists to reinforce army units in northern
Namibia, where one of the biggest operations in the 13 year war against nationalist guerrillas is said to be underway. Hundreds of trucks, troop carriers, and armored vehicles have been moved north through Windhoek in convoys often several miles long.”

With the coming of Independence and peace only the most intrepid travelers whole-heartedly jumped into a newly independent Namibia in the early 1990’s and pioneered this new tourist destination. Since those early days, the word has spread and continues to excite the traveling masses with extraordinary visions.

What was it exactly people were saying about Namibia? And why were their words creating a contagious buzz?

From the days our ancestor’s left Africa and ventured out into the frontiers of Asia minor and what is now Europe, to the Vikings of Scandinavia sighting Greenland for the first time, and even with the curiosity of a great philosopher himself, Thomas Jefferson willingly sending two men on a secret expedition to collect knowledge about the North American continent, human hearts have always discovered purpose and a rejuvenated living spirit in venturing to the unknown.

In an area half the size of Alaska…

Populated by only a measly 2 million people (Namibia is the least populated country in the world, second to only Mongolia) nature reaches to the far horizons, obstructed by nothing. Wildlife flourishes in what could easily be categorized as some of the earth’s harshest environments, giving life to endemic species such as the Desert Adapted Elephant and the Welwitschia mirabilis in the Namib Desert.

And with each year that passes…

The native peoples of Namibia are being understood and sought after. The San Bushmen of the Kalahari are treasured and marveled, placed upon the same pedestal as one of Africa’s last remaining semi-nomadic tribe -the Himba.

But even past the sights of an older world, the Herero, Kwangali, Damara, Lozi, and Owambo peoples spark curiosity and inspire compassion. Namibia’s rich diversity allows for new cultural activities and foods to be discovered and no trip shall go without delving into the ancient Bantu and Bushmen traditions… adding to the allure of a new tourist destination.

To walking a land where there are more wildlife than people.

Namibia – Best Safari Destinations

Northern Namibia may be the country’s most densely populated region, but, when compared to third world countries, it’s practically deserted. It is, furthermore, best known for its breathtaking natural wonders, and travelers looking to book their Namibia holidays should provide for an extended stay in this ruggedly beautiful area.

Although the list of stunning places to visit in Northern Namibia seems almost endless, close to the top must surely be Vingerklip, which translates as “Finger Rock”. Vingerklip forms part of the spectacular Ugab Rock Terraces, and it literally stands out from the surrounding plains like an accusatory finger pointing straight to the sky. Visitors to the area can stay at the local lodge, and, while they’re there, they can also enjoy buying handmade craft items from the indigenous Damara tribeswomen.

Like Vingerklip, Brandberg Mountain is also located deep within Damaraland, and its main claim to fame is that it’s home to the world famous rock painting known as The White Lady of Brandberg. Discovered in 1918, this painting, although quite off the beaten track, is well worth a visit as, at over 2,000 years old, it’s quite possibly one of the oldest Bushman paintings in existence. This colorful drawing depicts hunters in pursuit of a herd of oryxes, but it’s the mysterious White Lady, with her goblet and her bow, who is the most intriguing.

A half-hour or so away from the Brandberg is the extraordinary Messum Crater, and no Namibia tours would be complete without trekking to this imposing hole in the earth, which is all that’s left of the gigantic Etendeka volcanoes. The Messum is, perhaps, most well known for hosting Namibia’s most famous plant: The Welwitchia Mirabilis, which usually takes a couple of thousand years to grow a pair of leaves and which is well worth visiting.

Namibia holds prime position on Africa’s south-western coastline, and this starkly beautiful country offers visitors some of the best and most awe-inspiring scenery on the continent. It is, however, the enchanting region known as The Caprivi Strip that will remain in the impressionable tourist’s memory long after his or her Namibia tours are over and done with.

The Caprivi’s main attractions are its rivers – greatly prized in a country that’s mainly desert – and its game parks. Bwabwata Park is most well known for its elephants, kudu and buffalo, and visitors are advised to visit this lush natural preserve during October when most of the park’s game animals make a beeline for the available waterholes. Bwabwata Park is also home to over 300 species of birds, and it’s no wonder that birdwatching is almost a national sport in Namibia.

Namibia – Four Deserts Within One Country

When looking up Namibia in your travel guidebook you will read about the vast open plains of the Etosha National Park, the small coastal resort of Swakopmund with its old colonial buildings or the red sand dunes surrounding Sossusvlei and Deadvlei. But rarely do you come across an article that explains in detail the different desert environments that make up the south of our beautiful country called Namibia.

Coinciding with the “International Year of Deserts and Desertification” Gondwana Desert Collection in partnership with Open Africa and other stakeholders have launched a wide-ranging tourism route through the 4 deserts of Namibia. This aptly named “Four Deserts Route, Namibia” covers the whole of southern Namibia from the Tropic of Capricorn down to the Orange River.

In the east is the Kalahari Desert with its red sand dunes that are partially covered in grasses, shrubs and old camelthorn trees. Even though surface water is a rarity the Kalahari is home to fast numbers of antelope, predators and a surprising number of birds. The Kalahari Anib Lodge, Bagatelle Game Ranch and the Intu Africa Game Reserve to name but a few, are located within the perimeter of he Kalahari and are an ideal first night stop-over en route.

The Nama Karoo is characterized by dwarf shrub and scattered grassland and has as its distinctive feature the well know quiver tree. The deep gorges of the Fish River Canyon fall within this desert environment as well as the canyons of the Zebra River. Animals such as the indigenous Mountain Zebra can be found here. All four Canon Properties; Canon Lodge, Canon Village, Caron Roadhouse and Canon Mountain Camp as well as Zebra River Lodge are ideal overnight stops en route through the second desert to visit.

Situated around the historic town of Aus and extending south into Namaqualand of South Africa the Succulent Karoo is the third desert on our route to be visited. This environment is unique in that it receives winter rains and as such has specially adapted plants to survive the dry summer months. This desert is known as one of the most plant diverse in the world and has been listed as one of the world’s 25 global biodiversity ‘hotspots’. After the rains this seemingly dry and arid landscape turns into a spectacle of color as the many different plants flower. Animal life is reduced to small antelope and rodents, but fascinating enough are the wild desert horses resident just west of Aus. Klein Aus Vista just west of Aus offers beautiful accommodation in bungalows at Desert Horse Inn and rock chalets at Eagle’s Nest. The newly renovated Bahnhof Hotel in Aus also provides a comfortable bed for the weary traveler.

The fourth and last desert on our Route is the most well known of them all – the Namib Desert. This desert comprises of just a narrow strip along the cold Atlantic Ocean with red dunes (the highest in the word) in the south, gravel plains and inselbergs in the central parts and blue mountains with deep valleys in the north. The Namib reaches as far north as southern Angola and is home to the pre-historic Welwitschia plant. Fog coming in from the Atlantic supplies the life-giving moisture to plants and animals. The Namib offers a whole array of lodges and guest farms for travelers to Sossusvlei and the Namib Naukluft Park. Desert Homestead, Tsauchab River Lodge and Hoodia Desert Camp are but a few establishments where guests can stay for their last overnight on the ‘Four Deserts Route’.

ATI Holidays (Africa Tourist Info) is a British owned, Namibia based company specialising in tailor made holidays throughout Southern African and the Indian Ocean Islands. We are a small, highly experienced company offering our guests the most up to date local knowledge and advice in order to plan the perfect holiday for your individual interests and budget.

We also offer inspiring Honeymoons and specialised family holidays.

What Makes a Safari Experience in Namibia So Unique?

If African safari holidays are something you have ever considered, you will know that there are so many destinations to choose from, so what gives a Namibian safari the X-factor? Located between the Kalahari Desert and the South Atlantic covering a vast 800,000 square kilometres, Namibia is one of the most unique safari destinations of the world, with breathtaking scenery including deserts, oceans, dunes and mountains. Namibian safaris are unlike any other African safari adventure; the experience is as much about the adventure and exploring the landscape as much as it is about discovering the wildlife.

What makes Namibia so unique is the abundance of wildlife on display, large animals such as elephant, rhino, lion and zebra which can all be found in desert environments roaming freely as they are not restricted to designated reserves. There is also a wealth of small game and even many endemic species like the black faced impala to be found. Namibia is also a popular destination for bird watching, there are 630 species including some very range restricted birds to be spotted.

Namibia has twenty six parks and reserves on offer to display the wildlife. The three main tourist attractions for the wildlife include the Waterberg Plateau National Park, the Cape Cross Reserve and the most famous of these is the Etosha National Park which is the home to over one hundred mammal species. The parks and reserves range from the open bush of the centre and the north, to the inhospitable coastal strips.

To add some excitement to any safari experience the Skeleton National Park, the resting place to several shipwreck remains and large seal colonies is very popular. The Skeleton Coast located in the North West is considered one of the most desolate places on earth, as the landscape ranges from windswept sand dunes, rugged canyons and mountain ranges. The Skeleton National Park houses a great variety of specific including big cats, elephants, black rhinos and many more. Due to the inaccessibility of many of these camps, the Skeleton Coast is only accessible via four wheel drives in the southern section. The only way to experience the northern section is through a Fly-in safari. Fly-in safaris are generally preferred and offer a great way to take in the scenery. The Cape Cross Lodge is also an ideal retreat, just 4kms from the seal reserve offering luxury accommodation and breathtaking views.

Also not to be missed is the coastal town of Swakopmund which is fast becoming the adrenaline capital of Africa. The seaside town lies at the tail end of the Skeleton Coast and would provide an extra dimension to any safari holiday offering visitors the perfect opportunity to unwind. Swakopmund resembles a small German town with palm lined streets, promenades, restaurants, cafes, art galleries and museums. Night time entertainment ranges from casinos, pubs, restaurants to an assortment of drama, music and cultural events. The Sea Side Hotel and Spa is an ideal location to stay to combine the excitement of a safari and a pampering spa experience.

Safaris in Namibia are available all year round but the best game viewing periods are during the dry winter months between May and September. The winter temperatures can drop below freezing at night so you might prefer to visit in the milder months of October or April. Alternatively the best months for bird watching fall between November and April.

A Namibian safari is not only about wildlife encounters, it is a major attraction of Africa offering beautiful landscapes, deserts and mountains. As safaris in Namibia are generally less expensive than the perhaps more well known destination of Botswana and Tanzania, Namibia is a must visit place for every traveller and admirer of natural beauty.

Namibia, the Ultimate Game Drive

Namibia is home to the well know Etosha Pan, the remnants of an ancient lake that that is now home to a vast assortment of wildlife. When, or rather if, the annual rains fall between January and March this seemingly dead stretch of land comes to life, flamingos come, sometimes literally in the millions to feed on the algae and insects that the muddy sludge attracts. The pan itself falls under the protection of the Etosha National Park, one of Namibia’s largest game reserves. The vast area is home to the big five and is a top destination for anyone wanting to experience good game viewing.

The Etosha national park offers various camps for tourists to stay in, the most popular being Okakuyu, Namatoni and Halalli. Within these are a variety of accommodation options from camping to bed and breakfast. What make these camps so special are the water holes around which each is built. While setting out during the day on game drives is obviously recommended, the camps have curfews unless on an organised night drive with an experienced ranger. Within the camp however, at night, one can view game coming to the waterhole not 100m from where you sleep. It truly is one of the greatest holiday experiences you can have. While the Etosha national park is almost certainly the jewel in the crown it is by no means the be all and end all of Namibian tourist destinations.

If crossing the border from South Africa your first stop should be Ai-Aisthis transfrontier park, which offers a natural hot spring that has been turned into a very popular spa. The wildlife is limited but if you’re planning a long camping trip it is a nice way to ease into what could be a hot dusty few weeks. The accommodation is comfortable and the warm pools are welcome after a long day of driving. Even if leaving early in the morning, when travelling from Cape Town Ai-Ais is about as far across the border as you can get before you run out of sunlight.

If Namibia were to be known for one element it would no doubt be sand and the most famous icon of the sand is the spectacularly red sand dunes. The sand dunes at Sossusvlei have been called the highest in the world there are arguments against this, however, due to the mobile nature of Sand dunes it seems a moot point to argue. The best time to visit these natural wonders is at sunset and sunrise, this is partly due to the unbearable heat that area experiences at midday but mostly for the spectacle that occurs when the sunsets and rises against the deep red sand. The area’s deep red sand compliments the spectacular oranges and reds of the African sunset and provides a photo opportunity like no other in the world.

The coast of Namibia is uniquely beautiful, in that its rugged uninviting appearance is what makes it so appealing to so many. Known as the skeleton coast, named for the whale bones that used to litter the coast when the whaling industry was in full swing, this stretch of coast is unforgiving and in parts inaccessible. For the dedicated fisherman though this coast offers much reward. Some of the best game fishing in the world can be found here if you’re willing to put in the effort of getting there you’ll have some of the best shore fishing nearly all to yourself.

Attractive Places to Visit for Travelers in Namibia

Located in South Africa, Namibia is known for its contrasting landscapes.The terrain varies from coastal desert to mountains and plateau. Essentially, it is a desert country. Such a contrasting structure fascinates especially travelers who are interested in natural attractions. The Namibian landscape consists generally of four geographical areas and each area has its own characteristic conditions: Northern Namibia including Etosha Park, Kaokoland, Damaraland and the Waterberg Plateau; Southern Namibia including Sossusvlei, the Namib Desert, Fish River Canyon and Luderitz; Windhoek and Bushmanland located in Central Namibia and Coastal part in which the Skeleton Coast Swakopmund and Luderitz are.
Namibia is not highly populated and Namibians are of diverse ethnic origins. Germanic influence can still be found mainly in road infrastructure and most cities’ architecture. May to October is the most pleasant time to visit. The cultural diversity of its people, an extensive choice of parks, resorts and accommodation establishments make Namibia highly preffered tourist destination Namibia generally attracts eco-tourists who would like to experience the different climates and natural geographical landscapes of the country.
Windhoek is the capital city of the country. It has a modern city architectural. Among the modern buildings, the old German buildings stand out in the city. Christus Kirch of Windhoek is a place to see in the city. There are elegant shops and restuarants, clothing stores, expensive jewelers. Other major cities are Walvis Bay, Gobabis, Grootfontein, Karasburg, Keetmanshoop, Luderitz, Mariental, Rundu, Swakopmund, Tsumeb, Ondangwa and Oshakat.
Namibia has remarkable natural attractions and important tourist spots such as The Namib Desert, The Fish River Canyon, The Etosha National Park and The Kalahari Desert, The dunes of Sossusvlei, Waterberg Plateau Park, Namib Naukluft Park, Kaudom Game Reserve and many more.
The Etosha National Park owes its unique landscape to The Etosha Pan. This Namibian tourist attraction is home to an array of exotic flora and fauna. It is a place to go for wildlife.The Great Fish River Kanyon is one of the world’s largest canyons. It has a gorgeous view. A number of tracks lead to various viewpoints in which there is a sequence of plateaus. The Daan Viljoen Game Reserve is a great spot for bird watching. The park is a house for various animals such as blue wildebeest, kudu, zebras, gemsbok and springbok, red hartebeest, impala and more. Swakopmund is a small seaside town and a highlight of Namibia with excellent restaurants, pubs and discos, a few night clubs, a golf course in a desert setting.
In conclusion, Namibia has many wonderful places to visit. The country offers its visitors a number of tourist attractions and unforgettable moments. The wild life and contrasting landscapes are together and ready to be explored.
Let’s start exploring Namibia by the videos of Travelovideo!

Safari in Namibia: How to Spend Wisely

Wise spending does not always mean closely watching your bank account to assure you make it through your trip without breaking the bank. More importantly, wise spending means carefully choosing where and with whom you are spending your money, especially while on safari in Namibia.

Namibia offers countless ways to get your money in the hands of those who need it most. This means purchasing locally. The Namibian people are artistic in their ancient crafts and artistic skills. When hunting for the perfect souvenir, shop at markets or craft centers where the craftsmen are selling their crafts personally. Also don’t hesitate to ask how much they are receiving. There are some stores, especially in Windhoek, where the store owners are taking the largest percentage of profit, leaving the actual craftsman with little to nothing. These are the practices we all should shun upon and choose not to support. It’s not easy to know who is conducting such practices when traveling, so throughout the book the stores and markets mentioned are, to the best of our knowledge, owned by the craftsmen themselves or give back to the Namibian people in one way or another. When uncertain, look for the Namibia Based Tourism Assistance Trust or NACOBTA logo. NACOBTA is a non-profit organization striving to support communities to ensure profitability and more importantly sustainability. NACOBTA works with tour operators, craft centers, and places of accommodation.

Budget conscience travelers care more about where and how they spend their money than any other kind of travelers. However, don’t fuss over pennies. What’s a few Namibian dollars more for a taxi ride or a souvenir? Is it worth arguing over? Who’s going to benefit from the transaction more and will your extra dollars be going to a loaf of bread which will feed hungry small children? Let us broaden our horizons and think of the bigger picture before making a stink about what are essentially pennies and won’t affect your travels whatsoever.

Namibia Tour Operator: What a Great Operator Will Provide

When it comes to planning your safari to Namibia, Africa a great first place to search is a Namibia Tour Operator. Africa is a gigantic continent and it is important the operator doesn’t pretend to be something bigger than they are. An operator should concentrate entirely on their specialized region which enables them to keep their expertise and bundles of wealth colorful, up-to-date, and rich!

With an ever increasing pool of options to choose from, it is easy to become overwhelmed. Therefore a well managed operator should be able to do the following:

Eliminate Stress and the ‘run around’ trying to plan a safari – Receive the knowledge and intimacy of one expert.

The tour operator’s portfolio selection should absolutely be carefully developed to ensure the Namibia tour operators’ clients with an experience intertwined with planned activities and time to make your own adventure, catered for those looking for a more understood experience. These are perfect for families, groups, companies, churches, and special interest organizations.

Namibia is a great destination for self-drive safaris, thus the operator should be able to plan this exact desire. The self-drive safari is the perfect way to explore Namibia without a guide. It is easy to do and offers great variety to destinations and activities throughout the country.

In such a large country and traveling on limited time, a fly-in safari makes it possible for you to experience all the highlighted points of interest without making any sacrifices along the way. A great Namibia tour operator will be able to plan this option for you.

The Custom Safari option. These safaris are generally more expensive, but not in every case, because the research and planning begin ‘out of thin air.’ A good operator will put the time, energy, and resources into developing an outstanding safari itinerary which includes ALL your “must do” “must see” requests.

Essentially, if you want to travel to far flung destinations it is best to first consult a tour operator before you seek advice from travel agents who in most cases have never been to the destination, and/or knows it as intimately as a tour operator does. A Namibia tour operator that is well managed and affiliated with a number of reputable organizations and affiliations will provide you with a plethora of options to tailor the exact needs you desire.

Attractive Places to Visit for Travelers in Namibia

Located in South Africa, Namibia is known for its contrasting landscapes.The terrain varies from coastal desert to mountains and plateau. Essentially, it is a desert country. Such a contrasting structure fascinates especially travelers who are interested in natural attractions. The Namibian landscape consists generally of four geographical areas and each area has its own characteristic conditions: Northern Namibia including Etosha Park, Kaokoland, Damaraland and the Waterberg Plateau; Southern Namibia including Sossusvlei, the Namib Desert, Fish River Canyon and Luderitz; Windhoek and Bushmanland located in Central Namibia and Coastal part in which the Skeleton Coast Swakopmund and Luderitz are.
Namibia is not highly populated and Namibians are of diverse ethnic origins. Germanic influence can still be found mainly in road infrastructure and most cities’ architecture. May to October is the most pleasant time to visit. The cultural diversity of its people, an extensive choice of parks, resorts and accommodation establishments make Namibia highly preffered tourist destination Namibia generally attracts eco-tourists who would like to experience the different climates and natural geographical landscapes of the country.
Windhoek is the capital city of the country. It has a modern city architectural. Among the modern buildings, the old German buildings stand out in the city. Christus Kirch of Windhoek is a place to see in the city. There are elegant shops and restuarants, clothing stores, expensive jewelers. Other major cities are Walvis Bay, Gobabis, Grootfontein, Karasburg, Keetmanshoop, Luderitz, Mariental, Rundu, Swakopmund, Tsumeb, Ondangwa and Oshakat.
Namibia has remarkable natural attractions and important tourist spots such as The Namib Desert, The Fish River Canyon, The Etosha National Park and The Kalahari Desert, The dunes of Sossusvlei, Waterberg Plateau Park, Namib Naukluft Park, Kaudom Game Reserve and many more.
The Etosha National Park owes its unique landscape to The Etosha Pan. This Namibian tourist attraction is home to an array of exotic flora and fauna. It is a place to go for wildlife.The Great Fish River Kanyon is one of the world’s largest canyons. It has a gorgeous view. A number of tracks lead to various viewpoints in which there is a sequence of plateaus. The Daan Viljoen Game Reserve is a great spot for bird watching. The park is a house for various animals such as blue wildebeest, kudu, zebras, gemsbok and springbok, red hartebeest, impala and more. Swakopmund is a small seaside town and a highlight of Namibia with excellent restaurants, pubs and discos, a few night clubs, a golf course in a desert setting.
In conclusion, Namibia has many wonderful places to visit. The country offers its visitors a number of tourist attractions and unforgettable moments. The wild life and contrasting landscapes are together and ready to be explored.
Let’s start exploring Namibia by the videos of Travelovideo!